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No noise and no smoke 

Norway inaugurates cruise ship of the future  

The MS Roald Amundsen steamer, equipped with hybrid engines that must reduce fuel consumption by 20%, took to the waves for the first time at the beginning of the month.

The system was developed by Rolls Royce and enables the electric refills to be powered without having to connect them to terminals, giving the boat a battery life of about an hour. This is the time required to cross a Norwegian fjord... all without smoke, noise and CO2 emissions.

A fuel that calls upon the sea

The Norwegian company Hurtigruten, which operates the ship, plans to commission a second hybrid boat by the end of the year and is also planning to replace the pollution-causing ships for Arctic and Antarctic cruises.

For these much-longer trips, the company is working on a system for a most unexpected type of fuel, composed of fish remains mixed with other organic waste. This is a technology that should be operational within three years.

A ship pollutes more than a million cars

These innovations could enhance the image of cruise ships. According to a study published last June by the world leader in luxury cruises, Carnival Corporation, its 94 boats polluted ten times more than all 260 million cars in the European car fleet last year.

A single medium-sized ship emits more fine particles than a million cars. Creating "greener" ships are therefore a real challenge facing cruise companies, especially in the increasingly popular cruises in Antarctica, where carriers that use heavy fuel oil have been banned for several years.

Norway is one of the most advanced countries in the elimination of this highly polluting fuel. By 2026, the country wants to apply a "zero emission" requirement for ships and ferries sailing on its fjords, which are listed as a World Heritage site by UNESCO.

Source : Capital

 

In the Norwegian fjords

 

   

 

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